K-Town

Apparently I am months behind, but I don’t really know how I feel about this show.  I usually have this gut reaction to which is the sum of all of my stirring, unverbalized thoughts — kinda like a stoplight — and in this case I’d say it’s a yellow light as of right now.  In the very least, I know that Asian producers are behind the show, and after reading this on AngryAsianMan, I feel a lot more settled.  I actually came across the show reading a Korean friend’s blog, where she said she was ashamed.  I guess I can see why, because the Asians that made the casting cut are all very edgy and, at first glance, not people I would jump at the chance to hang out with.  My opinion on this is actually forming in *real time* as I am typing, because I am scouring the net as I leave this blogger open.

But then watching this…

fucking pisses me off, and now I see why the show should exist in the first place.  Asians, historically, aren’t represented well at all, and that youtube clip was pretty much a summary of all the images that ignorant people have in their heads of Asians.  I am unsettled by the show because all the guys in the cast SEEM  douche-y, and in a way they are representing me and the rest of the youthful-Asian-adults a bit inaccurately.  I don’t run around with my shirt off and holler at women at clubs with Michael Jackson moves like Young, and I don’t really know anyone that does either.  But at the same time, I am very happy to see aggressive, dominant, buff ass Asian guys casted into a reality show that could potentially be aired on MTV, because America needs to know that we don’t (just) study 24/7, throw ninja stars and karate chop to settle fights, and cure ailments with obscure Eastern remedies, run Asian mafias, speak with accents, and whatever other images an all-white town of Kentucky might have of us.  And I am also very glad that all the girls women on the show are all fucking hot (and aggressive/dominant and not the typical stereotype), and not just in the oriental-esque way that is common among attractive Asian women casted into movies/shows (like Zhang Zi Yi and Lucy Liu).

It was interesting reading a lot about this show on different Asian-Am blogs, but even more interesting is the division of opinions.  A lot of people are disgraced, a lot of people are in support.  In my opinion, the people who are disgraced have every legitimate reason to feel that way based on the cast, but I don’t think this is the only positive-stereotype-destroying representation of Asians out there.  In a semi-random side retrospect, I think subconsciously I was so excited about ABDC’s first season not just because Jabbawockeez and Kaba Modern represented the California dance scene so well, but because they were all Asian.  For once, I saw Asians tear up a mainstream media show.

Some excerpts from Daily Beast’s blog:

““Why can’t you see the Asian man get the girl?” Eugene Choi, one of the producers, recently asked rhetorically over the phone to The Daily Beast. He cites the ending of Romeo Must Die, in which Jet Li plays Romeo to Aaliyah’s Juliet. Despite the movie’s romantic buildup, it ends with a G-rated hug. The original ending with a kiss was re-written when it was ill-received by “urban audiences.”

(Scarlet) Chan says the men on the show won’t face that problem. “The guys are super cocky, really good-looking. They have game and know how to pick up girls,” she says. “They’re going to get so much pussy, it’s ridiculous.”

“Despite such inroads, Asians still represent only 1 to 3 percent of the television population, with that 1 percent accounting for recurring characters. Simply casting Asians alongside white actors “isn’t really effective,” says Vincent Pham, co-author of Asian Americans and the Media. And it goes without saying that while the spectacle of over-the-top, in-your-face Asians could be good for ratings, it’s not necessarily good for the group as a whole, says Dana Mastro, an associate professor of communications at the University of Arizona, Tucson, who studies stereotyping of racial and ethnic minorities on television and in media.

But others disagree. “It’s far more important to see the true variance of Asian Americans on TV, whether we like them or not, than to cherry-pick our chosen representatives in order to cast ourselves, however sparingly, in the best possible light,” Diana Nguyen, co-founder of Disgrasian, a blog devoted to pop culture from an Asian perspective, wrote to The Daily Beast. Besides, as Snooki and shows like Will & Grace have proven, stereotypes aren’t deadly. And it would be unfair to pin the burden of breaking down all stereotypes on to a singular show.”

I don’t watch TV at all, but I will definitely watch this show, and I hope some major network bites and airs the show.  I guess to sum it up, in a weird way this show makes me more proud to be Asian.

————–

“Indeed with the history come ugly, overlooked truths. Mako recalls a studio executive’s reaction when asked about featuring a non-Asian in the lead of “Kung Fu,” the classic 1970s TV show: “I remember one of the vice presidents — in charge of production, I suppose — who said, ‘If we put a yellow man up on the tube, the audience will turn the switch off in less than five minutes.’ ” James Shigeta, the star of “Flower Drum Song,” remembers a movie musical producer telling him, “If you were white, you’d be a hell of a big star.

fuck you.  40 years back.  and now.

———-

Generally, people that take the time to read the random shit on here are good friends of mine, from my facebook feed I assume (AWWWW thanks <3 ❤ ❤ ❤ <3).  But then I randomly noticed a huge ass spike today, and I found out that I got a Twitter shout out from KTownRealityTV. Thanks again for reading and good luck to you guys! 

The Asian Jersey Shore

by Joyce C. Tang Info

Joyce C Tang

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Chan says the men on the show won’t face that problem. “The guys are super cocky, really good-looking. They have game and know how to pick up girls,” she says. “They’re going to get so much pussy, it’s ridiculous.”

But is the mission to replace one set of stereotypes with its literal opposite too, well, literal?

Asian Americans have been making their way onto the small and big screen for decades, and are now being cast alongside their white counterparts in roles that have nothing to do with being Asian. There’s B.D. Wong, Ming Na, and Lindsey Price, and among those who have been cast beyond ancillary, supporting roles, Sandra Oh, John Cho, Daniel Dae Kim, and Lucy Liu.

“The guys are super cocky, really good-looking. They have game and know how to pick up girls,” says cast member Scarlet Chan.

 

Despite such inroads, Asians still represent only 1 to 3 percent of the television population, with that 1 percent accounting for recurring characters. Simply casting Asians alongside white actors “isn’t really effective,” says Vincent Pham, co-author of Asian Americans and the Media. And it goes without saying that while the spectacle of over-the-top, in-your-face Asians could be good for ratings, it’s not necessarily good for the group as a whole, says Dana Mastro, an associate professor of communications at the University of Arizona, Tucson, who studies stereotyping of racial and ethnic minorities on television and in media.

But others disagree. “[I]t’s far more important to see the true variance of Asian Americans on TV, whether we like them or not, than to cherry-pick our chosen representatives in order to cast ourselves, however sparingly, in the best possible light,” Diana Nguyen, co-founder of Disgrasian, a blog devoted to pop culture from an Asian perspective, wrote to The Daily Beast. Besides, as Snooki and shows like Will & Grace have proven, stereotypes aren’t deadly. And it would be unfair to pin the burden of breaking down all stereotypes on to a singular show.

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  1. Pingback: Contending Upward

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